How to Get Your Kids Involved in Keeping the Family Safe

Mother telling her daughter to not open the door to strangersIn a perfect world, you wouldn’t have to worry about the safety of your family, particularly your kids. But this is not a perfect world, and being informed and vigilant should come naturally to you as a homemaker.

Here are some ideas:

Talk to your family about safety

Discussions about safety don’t have to feel too serious or boring. They can be fun. For example, ask your kids for suggestions on how to stay safe. You might be surprised by what they can come up with. You can direct the conversation toward the right ideas without making your children feel frightened or bored.

Get to know your local area

Nothing beats preparation, and an important part of preparation is to understand the lay of the land. For example, if you are closest to a facility offering urgent care in Lehi, you should know how long it takes to get there, just in case you have an accident or incident at home. You must have their number posted where everyone can see.

Know the areas your children should never go to, as these areas might be dangerous. Avoiding such areas goes a long way in staying away from trouble.

Get some training in first-aid

If your kids are old enough, you may take them with you. In case someone in the family needs CPR or the Heimlich maneuver, if all of you know what to do, a life may be saved.

Teach your kids never to open the door for anyone

Of course, you can make exceptions, such as their grandparents. As for friends and neighbors, tell your kids to quickly get you instead of unlocking the door themselves.

Teach your kids about the importance of locking doors

Many home intruders use the front or back door to get into the house, because those doors are often unlocked. It’s a mental effort; a locked door can make an opportunistic intruder change their mind and move on.

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Safety should always be a priority in your family, and knowing what to do is often the reward of preparation.